The Color of Lies

Have you ever told a white lie to spare someone hurt feelings? Or maybe the truth isn’t as exciting as the little white lie you’ve replaced it with? I recently read an online article at learning-mind.com by Valerie Soleil about how white lies do more damage than one would think. The piece went on to say that lies are color blind and that placing “little” or “white” before lies doesn’t make it harmless. On the contrary, lies equate to dishonesty no matter the size or color.

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Writer’s Block: Falling into Free Verse

My sisters and I started a tradition long ago, which we call “gift of the day.” Since we live in different states, we pick up small gifts (a pair of socks, a dishtowel, etc.) for no reason and mail them at random times. They are little surprise reminders that say, “I’m thinking about you, and I love you.”

One day, years ago, I received a padded envelope from my sister Laurie. Inside was a small piece of wood, sanded and beautifully stained. I was perplexed! When I called and asked why she sent a piece of wood in the mail, she laughed and said, “It’s a Writer’s Block!”

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Book Spine Poetry: Earth Day

You can find poems anywhere! Even in a stack of books! Creating a spine poem is much like writing found poetry but instead of using the text from a page of a book or article, you use the titles printed on the spines of books. Simply arrange the books so the spines can be read like a sentence.

You don’t need a large number of books to create a spine poem, just an imagination. The children’s books in my poem below came from my small home library. Happy Earth Day!

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Paint Chip Poetry: 9-11

A few weeks back, I posted a Paint Chip Poetry exercise. It was so much fun, I thought I’d give it another try this week. The rules for Paint Chip Poetry are simple:

  • Choose a random selection of color swatches from your local hardware store or online.
  • Give yourself a time limit of ten or fifteen minutes.
  • Write a free verse poem using as many of the paint colors as possible in the time allotted.
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How to write a “Where I’m from” Poem (with template)

The poem, Where I’m From by George Ella Lyons is powerful! It is a literary snapshot of the poet’s most memorable images of her childhood. Through her text, she takes the reader on a journey to show them who she was as a child and who she is today. Educators, activists, psychologist, and others have used Ms. Lyons’ poem as a writing exercise for all ages. Let’s have some fun with it!

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How to Write a Found Poem: Thrift Shop Flowers

Found poetry is the literary version of a collage. The poems are made up of words taken from a printed document such as a newspaper article, a speech, a menu, junk mail, or even another poem (or in this case, a book on flowers from a thrift shop). The poet selects words from the document and rearranges them to create a poem.

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