Featured Poem on YourDailyPoem.com

Hi there my wonderful readers! Today my concrete children’s poem is featured on yourdailypoem.com! My “fractured nursery rhyme” poem, Hey Diddle Diddle is kicking off a week of poetry posts on the blog where poems are formated in the shape of the subject. Come on over and check it out and while you are there, stay a while and enjoy this fabulous site that reminds us “a poem a day keeps the doldrums away!”

The Color of Lies

Have you ever told a white lie to spare someone hurt feelings? Or maybe the truth isn’t as exciting as the little white lie you’ve replaced it with? I recently read an online article at learning-mind.com by Valerie Soleil about how white lies do more damage than one would think. The piece went on to say that lies are color blind and that placing “little” or “white” before lies doesn’t make it harmless. On the contrary, lies equate to dishonesty no matter the size or color.

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Visual Prompt: refuge in the library

We’ve all been there, pen in hand, waiting for a poem to arrive. Poetry prompts are a great way to get the juices flowing on those inevitable days when a poem doesn’t show up. The visual prompt below reminded me that we have many friends at the library on the shelves and those characters will always welcome us and give us a place to go when when we need it most.

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The F Word: How to Write a Transversen Poem

If you haven’t heard of the Triversen poetic form (aka Verset), you are in for a triple treat! Verset means “in one breath” and Triversen means “three.” This triple verse sentence structure is a poetic form developed by William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) that allows a poet to write about any subject or feeling in a concise format. The basic rules are as easy as 1-2-3:

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Writer’s Block: Falling into Free Verse

My sisters and I started a tradition long ago, which we call “gift of the day.” Since we live in different states, we pick up small gifts (a pair of socks, a dishtowel, etc.) for no reason and mail them at random times. They are little surprise reminders that say, “I’m thinking about you, and I love you.”

One day, years ago, I received a padded envelope from my sister Laurie. Inside was a small piece of wood, sanded and beautifully stained. I was perplexed! When I called and asked why she sent a piece of wood in the mail, she laughed and said, “It’s a Writer’s Block!”

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Letters to Mother Goose Series: Mother Goose’s reply (final poem).

I hope you’ve been enjoying my Letters to Mother Goose poetry series! Thirteen of Mother Goose’s characters have written a poem to Mother Goose in answer to her wish upon a star. This week, Mother Goose replies to all her characters in one final poem of the series. As a reminder, this was the wish that started it all:

Twinkle, twinkle, little star.  
I wonder how my children are. 
Up above the world so bright, 
if I may, I wish they'd write...
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Letters to Mother Goose Series: a Ship a-sailing

You know Mother Goose writes in rhyme, but do you know her characters are poets too? Welcome to week thirteen (just one week left) of my Letters to Mother Goose poetry series! This week the poem is penned by the captain and crew of the ship a-sailing in response to Mother Goose’s wish upon a star:

Twinkle, twinkle, little star.  
I wonder how my children are. 
Up above the world so bright, 
if I may, I wish they'd write...
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