Letters to Mother Goose Series: Georgie Porgie

Welcome back to week three of my Letters to Mother Goose poetry series! You know Mother Goose writes in rhyme, but did you know her characters are poets too? Join me today and all summer long as I share my series of poems (one each week) written to Mother Goose by the characters she created in response to her wish upon a star:

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Letters to Mother Goose Series: Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

Welcome to week two of my Letters to Mother Goose poetry series! You know Mother Goose writes in rhyme, but did you know her characters are poets too? Join me today and all summer long as I share my series of poems (one each week) written to Mother Goose by the characters she created in response to her wish upon a star:

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Tanka : Haiku’s Big Cousin

The word tanka means “short song” and is one of the oldest Japanese forms of poetry originating in the seventeenth century. The tanka is related to it’s shorter cousin, haiku, but isn’t as popular with American poets. Traditional Japanese tanka poems are made up of 31 syllables written in a single, unbroken line. However, the tanka poems in English takes on a five-line form, consisting of a 5/7/5/7/7 syllable count.

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Travel Haiku: Taking Haiku on the Road

Early this month, we talked about how to start a Haiku Journal. As mentioned, famous Japanese poet, Matsuo Basho, recorded his travels by way of haiku in his diary. I recently took a drive to the northern California coast for some R & R and thought I’d follow Basho’s lead by poetically recording what I saw each day. Here are a few of my travel haiku, hopefully you can “see” what I saw through the imagery in these poems:

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